THE HISTORY OF THE TAROT


It is believed that the concept of the Tarot originated in ancient Egypt as a learning and initiatory tool. After the height of the civilisation had past, and with persecution from other religions, the Tarot was developed to symbolically represent the spiritual journey through life. In this way it was possible to secretly pass on a vast amount of ancient wisdom concerning the mystery and purpose of life, but only to those who could intuitively understand the symbolism. During the Renaissance, when rich Italian patrons such as the Medicis were paying scholars to find and translate ancient Egyptian and Greek manuscripts, much knowledge previously unknown in the West was brought to light, including a body of work known as The Hermetica.



The ibis-headed god, Djehuti


The Hermetica is a collection of writings traditionally attributed to the Egyptian god Djehuti (Thoth), who was venerated in Egypt from at least 3000 BCE. He was a god of wisdom, connected with intellectual pursuits in both arts and and sciences. He is credited with the invention of hieroglyphic writing, and is associated with speech, geometry, medicine, healing and measurement. He is said to have written Forty-Two Books representing all the wisdom of the world. Some contained the laws of Egypt, and others were books of high magic, for Djehuti was a great magician, rivaled only by Isis.

It was during the Renaissance that the first Tarot decks, as we know them today, were printed and used. It is highly probable that their design and content were derived from the ancient wisdom that was re-emerging at that time. My own research has shown that the wisdom encapsulated in the Tarot is entirely in keeping with ancient Egyptian mystery traditions, and Djehuti is in fact one of my spiritual guides.